Dairy farmers are scrambling to adapt to rising demand for milk

Cow and egg farmers across the country are scrambling for milk to meet soaring demand for egg and chicken broth, but they’re not alone. 

The rising demand is fueled by rising prices and the expansion of dairy farms. 

“We’re seeing a lot of demand for dairy products, and a lot more demand for chicken broth and chicken products,” said Sara F. Smith, a dairy farmer from New Jersey. 

She has seen demand for both grow. 

With milk prices rising by more than 40% over the past year, Smith is looking to expand her operation. 

I think they’re really hungry for something that will keep them on top of their food security, and chicken is a great one for that, she said. 

Focusing on eggs has also been challenging for many dairy farmers. 

Farmers have to make a decision on when to harvest eggs, and how long to do so. 

A chicken farmer in New Jersey said he doesn’t know if he will sell his entire herd because he doesn`t want to sell more than 1,000 birds a day. 

And some farmers are finding that chicken broth is their only source of protein, while other farmers have to supplement their supply with milk. 

Smith said there are no restrictions for how much chicken broth they can use. 

If they`re going to use it for egg production, it has to be made in-house. 

For farmers, this is a time when there`s a lot to consider. 

So far, Smith said, she`s done a lot research. 

There are about 6,000 dairy farmers nationwide, but it`s just a fraction of the 1.5 million farms in the U.S. Most farmers have at least a dozen animals to work on, and each animal needs the right amount of milk, egg and poultry broth to be successful. 

Many farmers are making their own milk for the cows, so they have to buy it at a higher price than other farmers. 

 “We have to take care of our animals,” Smith said.

“We can`t be feeding our cows the same amount of chicken as the cows. 

We have a lot less to go and do to keep our cattle healthy.” 

While many farmers are concerned about the future of the industry, others are making decisions that will help them survive. 

Cheryl L. Johnson, a professor at the University of New Hampshire, is a consultant for the dairy industry. 

Johnson said her research indicates that a lot will depend on how quickly and effectively the industry can adapt. 

It`s not going to be easy, but I think it`ll be worth it,” she said, adding that she believes that the milk shortages will come when people have to find ways to feed themselves. 

Dairy farmers, who rely on milk for about half of their revenue, are working hard to find a solution. 

Some are trying to find new sources of protein to feed their animals, and some are finding other ways to make more milk for their livestock. 

They`re also looking at new products to help increase the amount of protein in their cows.